Burnham father and son praised for clearing fly-tipping at their own expense

A father and son have been praised by the Burnham community for clearing a case of fly-tipping in the village at their own expense.

A father and son have been praised by the Burnham community for clearing a case of fly-tipping in the village at their own expense.

Matt Keating and his dad Steve Keating, co-owners of their business General Waste and Refuse Removal, saw a post on the Burnham Facebook groups on Monday about fly-tipping in Nashdom Lane in Burnham.

Feeling ‘disgusted’ by the sight of the fly-tipping in the lane, the pair then set to work on the same day, clearing the mess, which consisted of household items such as clothes, bin bags, metal fans and cardboard boxes, ‘strewn’ all over the site.

Filling their van to the brim, 28-year-old Matt and 59-year-old Steve then took most of the waste to Chalvey Household Waste Recycling Centre’s trade waste department, paying for the disposal of the items themselves.

The metal items were taken to a scrap dealer.

Matt also posted videos of their clearance onto their business page on Facebook and various local Facebook groups, which is something they always do to prove that the waste has been disposed of in the correct manner.

Upon making the post on the social media site, the pair were flooded with comments of praise.

Discussing the reaction, Steve said: “It makes me feel quite humble and so proud of my son and myself.

“[It makes me feel] very humble actually that people have appreciated what we did. We didn't do it for appreciation we done it purely and simply because it needed doing.”

Matt and Steve have also carried out various other good deeds in the community such as clearing away a small armchair and some carpet that was fly-tipped in St Peter’s Church churchyard in April.

Explaining their reasons, Steve added: “We've all got to live in the same area, and no one likes to see all the rubbish laying around so it's really important.”

Matt added: “We do it mainly out of respect to the community and other people, but at the same time, it’s also to protect the environment that we're in.

“It comes out of our own pocket, the reason being they didn't ask for it to be dumped there and somehow they've got to get rid of it.

“If we can help out a little bit within the community, we'll do anything we can.”

Discussing how he feels to have carried out these good deeds in the community, Steve added: “I absolutely love it, I get such a warm feeling that I've helped someone out.

“If I can put a little bit of money out of Matt and mine's pocket into helping someone and their happy, I'm happy and I just get a buzz out of it.”

Commenting on their efforts, Carol Keating, 57, Matt’s mum and Steve’s wife, said: “I am so proud of what they do for the community, they do it without being asked and don't expect any reward or gratification for doing so.

“Wish there were more people like Steve and Matt in every community.”