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Council cracks down on commercial vehicle crime

More than 100 people using commercial vehicles to commit crimes and anti-social behaviour were stopped in one day following a new multi-agency operation.

Slough Borough Council teamed up with Thames Valley Police and the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) for a clampdown on vehicles being used illegally.

The operation in Langley on August 21, known as ‘Operation Cesium’, prevented common offences including fly-tipping and the use of non-roadworthy vehicles.

Over the course of the day, five vehicles were took off the road for insurance offences, nine penalties were issued for driving offences, and one notice was issued for waste documentation to be produced.

Kurt Henney from the council’s housing and enforcement team, said: “Slough and surrounding areas have been suffering a spate of fly-tipping, much of which comes from commercial vehicles where people pretend they have a licence to dispose of waste when they don’t.

“This operation was designed to both catch drivers acting illegally and serve as a deterrent to anyone thinking of breaching the law. This was the first operation of this kind in Slough, but it won’t be the last.”

Councillor Pavitar K Mann, (Lab, Britwell and Northborough), lead member for regulation and consumer protection, said: “This operation clearly shows there are drivers and vehicles which are not fit to be on the road, operating illegally and putting local residents at risk.

“I would encourage any resident who is getting rid of rubbish to make sure they are using a properly licensed business; don’t leave it to chance or encourage the illegal behaviour which leads to fly-tipping and unsightly dumped waste.

“Hopefully those caught have learned their lesson – especially those who had to take to two feet after having their vehicles seized – and now know we will not tolerate this kind of behaviour in Slough.”

 

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