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Burnham care home calls for postcards following reduced interaction due to coronavirus

Burnham care home calls for postcards following reduced interaction due to coronavirus

Photo from Google

An elderly care home in Burnham is asking the public to send in postcards after implementing reduced interaction measures due to the COVID-19 outbreak.

In a post on its Facebook page, Forget me not Residential Home, said: “As our variety of activities have been significantly reduced with interaction with the community we have been racking our brains about how our residents can still have safe contact with you all.

“We are asking everyone to just spend time by sending an interesting postcard to the home for us to show and discuss with residents.

“It could be picture of your local area, an item they might have used in days gone by, or a photo that will make them laugh. Maybe you child might like send a drawing in to them. Anything will be gratefully received, we would just like them to continue with their contact with the community and public.

“They will be so appreciative of your thoughts and kindness.”

Send all postcards to Forget me not home, Leaholme Gardens, Burnham, SL1 6LD.

On Wednesday, March 11, the home announced on its Facebook page that it would be implementing its emergency contingency plan, which includes visits from immediate family members being restricted to an hour-and-a-half between 2pm and 3.30pm until further notice.

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  • Chompy

    11:36, 17 March 2020

    Being a biological science graduate with an interest in microbiology and experience in a hospital microbiology laboratory, I have some valid concerns about this. One postcard plus stamp, touched by... 1 - person who put postcard on display 2 - several people who picked postcard up and looked at it 3 - person who eventually purchased postcard 4 - person at checkout that took payment for postcard 5 - person who sold stamp 6 - postal worker collecting it from letterbox 7 - postal workers (who knows how many) getting it to it's destination 8 - initial recipient at care home 9 - person who took postcard to addressee 10 - everyone in care home who looked as postcard Any one of these people could be carrying the virus and contaminating the postcard. It is such a lovely idea, but is it wise? Could the infection chain be reduced by sending e-mails (with photos if necessary) instead?

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    • Stranger

      01:00, 18 March 2020

      At this point, the actual harm caused by the illness is far, far outweighed by the social and economic cost of the massive and disproportionate response to it. As a biological science graduate I would like you and others of your profession to start thinking seriously about how long you expect the average human lifespan to be, reasonably. As there is no cure or vaccine for this virus at the moment, it is going to spread, and we need to be realistic about the fact that some people will contract it, a very few of those will not recover and will die, but life needs to go on. So we should stop about obsessing about it. Even if you were able to develop a vaccine tomorrow (and not, as is more likely, in 5 or so years), there won't be the infrastructure or money, or even civil society, around to distribute it, at this rate. Wouldn't you rather be thinking about productive things in your field than contributing to all this hype while everything goes to rack and ruin? Could be that within a couple of months, stopping the spread of the virus won't be on anyone's mind, as there could be troops on the streets and someone running up behind you to club you behind the head for the toilet paper in your hands as you return from the shops. Please help to talk this overreaction down and not up, using scientific reasoning. Point out how many die from flu every year, how deaths are tapering off in Italy, etc. Things like that. The brutality of the real world and the brutes within it must be staved

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      • Chompy

        13:54, 18 March 2020

        I totally agree about the over-reaction, the fact that there will inevitably be deaths, and that vaccine development will take a considerable time before it's anywhere near ready for licensing approval and mass production. But, one key point many people overlook, is that we need to delay the spread of this virus over as long a period as possible (flatten the curve, to use that current buzz-phrase) to minimise the over-stretching of our health resources. Thousands of patients needing high/dependency intensive care resources over the period of a year is far easier to manage than those same patients needing the same resources over a period of, for example, 8 weeks... the same goes for the need for toilet roll, lol.

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        • Stranger

          16:46, 18 March 2020

          Imagine how flexibly and easily the NHS would work, and how people would be going about their everyday lives, and the economy going well, if information had been more carefully controlled. The fact that people are being informed about coronavirus and have been informed/warned about it for months, doesn't help alleviate the pressure on the NHS. The NHS runs on money, money is raised by taxes on income and capital, and tax revenue only comes in if you have a functioning economy. There will be no NHS, no law and order and stability, if nothing works. I really rue the fact that people had been warned and scared into a state of readiness before it even got here. It would have been possible to simply say, "oh, the flu virus is catching out many more people than last year, so let's alleviate taxes on fuel". Who's going to get a microscope out and check if what were said was true? Control of information is the opportunity to cap the damage of this virus - it's an opportunity that's lost, the cat is out of the bag, and untold damage will unfold from public "awareness" as time goes on. We don't have a WW2-type cohesive society. People are mostly idiots, and they can't handle the truth. They just want reassuring messages. A surrogate religion, as it were. Management. Don't see why the tools that exist were never deployed. D-notices and the like.

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  • Chompy

    11:36, 17 March 2020

    Being a biological science graduate with an interest in microbiology and experience in a hospital microbiology laboratory, I have some valid concerns about this. One postcard plus stamp, touched by... 1 - person who put postcard on display 2 - several people who picked postcard up and looked at it 3 - person who eventually purchased postcard 4 - person at checkout that took payment for postcard 5 - person who sold stamp 6 - postal worker collecting it from letterbox 7 - postal workers (who knows how many) getting it to it's destination 8 - initial recipient at care home 9 - person who took postcard to addressee 10 - everyone in care home who looked as postcard Any one of these people could be carrying the virus and contaminating the postcard. It is such a lovely idea, but is it wise? Could the infection chain be reduced by sending e-mails (with photos if necessary) instead?

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  • Chompy

    11:35, 17 March 2020

    Being a biological science graduate with an interest in microbiology and experience in a hospital microbiology laboratory, I have some valid concerns about this. One postcard plus stamp, touched by... 1 - person who put postcard on display 2 - several people who picked postcard up and looked at it 3 - person who eventually purchased postcard 4 - person at checkout that took payment for postcard 5 - person who sold stamp 6 - postal worker collecting it from letterbox 7 - postal workers (who knows how many) getting it to it's destination 8 - initial recipient at care home 9 - person who took postcard to addressee 10 - everyone in care home who looked as postcard Any one of these people could be carrying the virus and contaminating the postcard. It is such a lovely idea, but is it wise? Could the infection chain be reduced by sending e-mails (with photos if necessary) instead?

    Reply

    Report

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