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Brexit Q & A: Windsor and Slough MPs address voting record on Brexit

Brexit Q & A: Windsor and Slough MPs address voting record on Brexit

Prime Minister Theresa May will seek an extension to Article 50 this week after MPs failed to agree on proposals for the next steps in the Brexit process.

Politicians were given four alternatives to Mrs May’s proposed withdrawal deal in the House of Commons last week.

Options suggested included the UK joining a permanent customs union, holding a public vote to confirm any deal agreed by parliament, a Common Market 2.0 proposal and handing Parliament the power to cancel Brexit to avoid a no-deal scenario.

Windsor MP Adam Afriyie and Slough MP Tan Dhesi had the following record on the four indicative votes:

Adam Afriyie

Customs union - Against

Common Market 2.0 - Against

Confirmatory referendum - Against

Parliamentary supremacy - Against

Tan Dhesi

Customs union - For

Common Market 2.0 - For

Confirmatory referendum - For

Parliamentary supremacy - Did not vote


The Express asked the Windsor and Slough MPs about their voting records:

Windsor MP Adam Afriyie 

What was the reasoning behind your voting record on the four indicative votes held on the Brexit process?

AA: The four motions on Monday, April 1, all of which had already been rejected by Parliament the previous week, aimed to defy the referendum result and keep the UK in the EU by the backdoor. It was disappointing that the amendments I wanted, that would have given us a way to exit the EU’s backstop and keep the UK united, were not selected.

What is your preferred course of action for the Brexit process going forward?

AA: I will continue to fight for Brexit by opposing sneaky amendments designed to keep us in the EU. I will also continue to vote against the withdrawal agreement unless we can keep our United Kingdom together by having an exit route from the backstop. It is time for MPs to accept that we must leave and, if the EU refuses to make reasonable amendments to the withdrawal agreement, we must manage our transition to WTO terms and then trade agreements worldwide.

What do you make of the argument that an MPs voting record should reflect how their constituency voted?

AA: I believe that all MPs should vote to respect the referendum result. It is also important to remember that votes were not counted by parliamentary constituency but by local authority area. My own constituency, Windsor, comprises wards in three local authorities. Overall it looks as though the Royal Borough voted to remain whilst the parliamentary constituency – which includes wards in RBWM, Bracknell Forest, and Slough – voted to leave. Ultimately is impossible to accurately determine the results of the referendum for all UK constituencies.

That said, we voted as one nation and Parliament should respect the decision made by the electorate as a whole, or else it risks being seen as distant from the people it serves.

I believe that the Prime Minister’s badly negotiated, botched deal is bad for our country’s interest and therefore voted against that once again.

A ‘no-deal’ Brexit would be catastrophic for our economy, people’s jobs and much more besides - hence I voted against that.

I abstained on revoking Article 50 for now, because I don’t believe we’re at that stage yet. If in future the Tory government foolishly tried to push through a no-deal Brexit against our Parliament’s expressed wish, then I would vote for that.

In order to try and respect the result of the 2016 referendum, and work towards a compromise solution, I voted to keep other sensible, credible options on the table. That’s why I voted for a ‘Customs Union’ Brexit, ‘Common Market 2.0’ and the ‘confirmatory public vote’ option.

These all allow us to maintain a close relationship with our neighbouring partners the EU, which I feel would be in our long term national interest.”

Slough MP Tan Dhesi

What was the reasoning behind your voting record on the four indicative votes held on the Brexit process?

I believe that the Prime Minister’s badly negotiated, botched deal is bad for our country’s interest and therefore voted against that once again.

A ‘no-deal’ Brexit would be catastrophic for our economy, people’s jobs and much more besides - hence I voted against that.

In order to try and respect the result of the 2016 referendum, and work towards a compromise solution, I voted to keep other sensible, credible options on the table. That’s why I voted for a ‘Customs Union’ Brexit, ‘Common Market 2.0’ and the ‘confirmatory public vote’ option.

These all allow us to maintain a close relationship with our neighbouring partners the EU, which I feel would be in our long term national interest.”

Why did you abstain on the vote over parliamentary supremacy on Brexit?

I abstained on revoking Article 50 for now, because I don’t believe we’re at that stage yet. If in future the Tory government foolishly tried to push through a no-deal Brexit against our Parliament’s expressed wish, then I would vote for that.

What do you make of the argument that an MPs voting record should reflect how their constituency voted?

No answer supplied.

 

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